Shark Family – One Big, Happy, Carnivorous Family

Embed this infographic on your site

The earliest sharks date from more than 420 million years ago, before the time of the dinosaurs! The 400 species of modern sharks have evolved in various ways and scientists have classified them into the 8 major groups shown in this graphic. See how sharks fit into this family tree, from the most well-known sharks like the great white and tiger sharks, to the bizarre lesser-known sharks like the frilled shark, goblin shark and cookiecutter shark.


See our entire series of Shark Week posts:

  • Shark Speed
  • Shark Weight
  • Shark Bites
  • Flying Sharks
  • Shark Family

Flying Sharks – The Highest Leaping Sharks

Embed this infographic on your site

Most sharks are content to be bottom dwellers. They scavenge the bottom for food at a slow methodical pace. A few predatory sharks have stronger tails that thrust them forward at great speeds to catch their prey. Periodically these sharks breach the surface in a burst of speed.


A writer from National Geographic describes what it’s like to see a flying shark:

The highest I have ever seen a white shark jump out of the water is about eight to ten feet [two and a half to three meters] clear of the water. Occasionally you will be looking vacantly out across the ocean and one of the sharks of Seal Island will suddenly take to the air, leaving you and your guests speechless as to how such a huge animal can jump so high.

We have on many occasions also seen makos go a lot higher than white sharks, and it is an amazing sight to see a cartwheeling mako in action. Many other species of sharks jump on a regular basis, such as threshers, copper sharks, spinner sharks, and salmon sharks. A breach usually lasts less than one second, so if you are looking in the wrong place, all you get to see is a big splash and a lot of hollering from those who did see it.

Check out a few videos of these sharks in action:

Mako Shark

Great White

Thresher Shark

Spinner Shark


See our entire series of Shark Week posts:

  • Shark Speed
  • Shark Weight
  • Shark Bites
  • Flying Sharks
  • Shark Family

Shark Bites – The World’s Deadliest Sharks

Embed this infographic on your site

Part of the reason the Discovery channel runs shark week every year is that sharks are largely misunderstood creatures. True, they’re also scary looking efficient killing machines, but they are not as deadly as you might think. Only 15% of attacks result in fatalities and they are only the 10th most dangerous animal (as far as fatalities per year) in the U.S. So which sharks are the most dangerous? Check it out in this third infographic in our shark week series.


See our entire series of Shark Week posts:

  • Shark Speed
  • Shark Weight
  • Shark Bites
  • Flying Sharks
  • Shark Family

Shark Weight – The Most Massive Sharks

Embed this infographic on your site

It may surprise you just how massive some sharks are. The largest shark, the whale shark is 2 feet longer than a typical school bus and weighs more than twice as much! (The average 38′ 84 passenger school bus weighs between 22,000-28,000 lbs). Luckily for us and most of the sea creatures out there, the two largest sharks alive today feed mostly on plankton. That makes the Great White the largest predator shark. On the other end of the scale the Dwarf Lanternshark is currently the smallest known shark, reaching only 8.3 inches (21.2cm) in length.


See our entire series of Shark Week posts:

  • Shark Speed
  • Shark Weight
  • Shark Bites
  • Flying Sharks
  • Shark Family

Shark Speed – The World’s Fastest Sharks

Yesterday marked the beginning of the Discovery Channel’s 25th season of Shark Week, an all out learning and entertainment fest centered on one of the least understood and most highly feared animals on our planet – the shark.

Here at Zoology Degree Online we love learning about all animals, but sharks are particularly fascinating.

Embed this infographic on your site


See our entire series of Shark Week posts:

  • Shark Speed
  • Shark Weight
  • Shark Bites
  • Flying Sharks
  • Shark Family

Deadliest Animals in the United States [infographic]

Have you ever wondered what the most deadly animal is in the United States? Is it a predator like a mountain lion, bear or shark? Is it a poisonous snake or insect? The answer might surprise you.

We’ve pulled together data from several injury and fatality databases to pull together a list of the deadliest animals in the United States.

Embed this infographic on your site

The majority of the fatality figures in this infographic can be found in the Underlying Cause of Death, 1999-2009 report from the National Center for Health Statistics database. We ran a search on causes of death and found the codes linked to animal-related fatalities. Specifically:

Code* Cause of Death Deaths
V80 Rider or occupant injured by fall from or being thrown from animal or animal-drawn vehicle in noncollision accident 867
W55 Bitten or struck by other mammals 798
X23 Contact with hornets, wasps and bees 613
W54 Bitten or struck by dog 309
W57 Bitten or stung by nonvenomous insect and other nonvenomous arthropods 107
X25 Contact with other specified venomous arthropods 83
X21 Contact with venomous spiders 81
W59 Bitten or crushed by other reptiles 77
X20 Contact with venomous snakes and lizards 68
W56 Contact with marine animal 11
W58 Bitten or struck by crocodile or alligator 9
X29 Contact with unspecified venomous animal or plant 8
X22 Contact with scorpions 6
X24 Contact with centipedes and venomous millipedes (tropical) 4
W53 Bitten by rat 3
X26 Contact with venomous marine animals and plants 1
X28 Contact with other specified venomous plants 1

* We’ve included the code so you can see exactly what data we pulled

The National Center for Health Statistics database is full of helpful tables like the one above. For example if you wanted to know how Cattle & Bull ranked so highly on the list above, you could check out this report from just 4 states over 5 years.

Wikipedia also maintains fairly detailed list of animal-related deaths worldwide as well as those that occur in the United States.